Friday, February 24, 2017

Campsite Cricket

Having a budding young cricket player on our hands, it wasn't difficult finding Miggie around the campsite at Mahai in the Drakensberg during December when we were looking for her.  Just find the nearest cricket game and she will be there.  Preferably one with adults playing as "they bowl better", to quote her.





Friday, February 17, 2017

Mahai Campsite - heaven in the Drakensberg

Nestled in a beautiful valley in the Royal Natal National Park of the Northern Drakensberg is a campsite that regularly makes lists of top campsites in South Africa. Six years ago we discovered Mahai Campsite for the first time and spend an unfortunate holiday there during major floods that hit the area that summer.  Even with all that it still counts as one of our favorite holidays and when we left that year we vowed to be back some time.  After making a few other summer holiday turns over the last few years we decided to head back to the Berg this past December and topped our previous visit by a country mile.    


Mahai lies along the Mahai River in the shadow of the Dooley Mountain with the world famous Amphitheatre looking on over its shoulder.  What does this mean? The campsite is IN the mountains.  It's definitely not one of those campsites that sell itself as a Drakensberg campsite yet the mountains are only visible on the horizon.  Here the sun disappears behind the mountain in the late afternoon, summer thunderstorms roll straight off the mountains and the mountain streams and hiking trails run right through your backyard.  It truly is a mountain campsite. In the mountains.  With mountains all around.

Mahai has about 120 campsites equally split between electric and non electric sites with more than enough ablution facilities, washing up areas and space.  Lots and lots of space.  It's definitely not one of those campsites where you are squashed in like sardines in summer like you often see along the coast.  The campsites are huge and the space between even bigger.  Facilities are well looked after, ablutions kept clean and security is tight keeping day visitors to the park as well as passing baboon troops out. 

If you want to know anything while at Mahai you just ask Lucky.  Lucky is supposed to be the day security guy but he literally is Mr Mahai.  In addition to being day security he makes sure everything in the camp runs smoothly, he points out empty spots to arriving campers, is always available to give you a helping hand and chases off any baboons coming too close.  Lucky is always smiling and returning campers come over to greet him with a hearty handshake and a "How are you Lucky? Great to see you again."  Lucky is also teaching himself to be a birder and always have his binocs and bird book handy.  Most importantly, the kids just love him.  Probably because he's always friendly.

One of the best parts of Mahai is the fact that I can just sit in front of my tent and watch the mountains, listen to the nearby stream and just chill.  Relax heaven and one huge adapter to plug one's soul into for a major recharge.  Also because it's a back to nature campsite people really respect the environment so nobody spoils the atmosphere with load music and parties.  It's about listening to the wind in the trees, the stream flowing over the rocks and the Piet-my-Vrou calling rather than your neighbour's doef doef music.  Absolute heaven. 


Mahai is like a free range reserve for kids.  The whole campsite is enclosed with only two gates so you know the kids won't go very far.  They tend to disappear in the mornings and only reappear when they get hungry or thirsty.  If there was a cricket game somewhere we knew exactly where to find Miggie while Chaos Boy kept on searching out a quiet spot somewhere to read a book or let his imagination run wild with him without being disturbed.  The kids were like herds of animals the way they grouped up and kept on moving from one place to another. 

The campsite may not have a swimming pool but there is no shortage of spots to go for a swim.  The main swimming area is about 700 meters up the Mahai River from the campsite at the Cascades, a safe swimming spot where the river cascades over a series of little waterfalls and through shallow pools.  If you're looking for something a little quieter then there are more than enough options along the path upstream.  A couple of times the herd of kids (under the watchful eye of one or two parents) would just go for a swim in the river right outside the campsite.  You may not be able to dive in and swim laps in the river, but what is better than being able to swim in a fresh clean mountain stream like this?  Definitely not something us city folk get to do very often.

The biggest advantage of staying at Mahai is the fact that you don't have to get in the car to drive somewhere to be able to go for a walk in the mountain.  The trails all start right outside the gate and vary in length and difficulty.  We did a couple of easy 6 km morning trails during our stay while I headed off on a longer 13 km walk the one day to find some Geocaches.  Did I mention there are about 50 Geocaches in the park? No? Well now I did.  As we opted to just do nothing on a couple of days we didn't get to do all the trails in the area and some of the longer and more challenging ones we left for a future visit.     

The trails don't just offer beautiful mountain and valley views.  Most of them cross various streams along the way and end up at a waterfall at some stage or another.  Lot's of opportunities to fill water bottles, cool down feet and bodies or just sit and watch the water flow by.  


Deciding to return to the Drakensberg this summer was the best decision we could make and you can't go wrong by choosing Mahai as your Drakensberg campsite of choice.  It's may not be a "resort type" campsite with holiday programs and organised activities to keep everybody busy, or have a pool with slides and a putt putt course next to it.  But who needs all of that when you have the mountains all around you to admire, lots of space to set your head straight in again, hiking trails to get out on, streams to cool off in, waterfalls and the chance to really immerse yourself in nature?  

Everything has a bit of a downside though and it can't always be moonshine and roses, so I don't want to pretend that Mahai is any different.  The first of the two biggest ones for us was the fact that the nearest town is a good 50km away and unless you carry absolutely everything with you and have a proper fridge along you will have to make the trip at least once, especially seeing that the little shop in the park has a very limited variety of things.  The other is the fact that you are in the mountains in a summer rainfall area and its nothing strange to have a thunderstorm suddenly appearing over the mountain mid or late afternoon that comes to mess around with your braai fire.  Just make sure your tent is properly waterproof and there there is enough firelighters around to get the fire going again and Bob's your uncle.  We did have one spectacular midnight thunderstorm with Miggie not being very impressed with the thunder and lightning, but seeing that we're not used to thunderstorms I really enjoyed listening (and watching) to it pass over.  Ok, so these are minor downsides compared to all the advantages of camping at Mahai but I just wanted to mention them. 

If Mahai and the Drakensberg wasn't so far from Port Elizabeth we would probably head out that way a lot more often than once every few years.  At about 1 100 km the trek is just a bit on the long side.  Next time we'll probably try and visit in winter to see what these mountains look like covered in snow but regardless of when, we will definitely be back.

Disclosure: This camping holiday at Mahai in the Drakensberg was our annual summer holiday and was done at our own cost 

Monday, February 13, 2017

Camping in the Drakensberg

The general holiday question is always, BEACH or BUSH?  I will probably choose bush over beach 7 out of 10 times but that's because I live on the coast.  It's also because I love getting away to a forest, the bush, a game reserve or the wide open spaces of the Karoo.  Although I feel you can group all these things into the BUSH category, something is definitely missing from that question though.  MOUNTAINS, definitely mountains.  The question should be BEACH, BUSH or MOUNTAINS.  This past December holiday we chose mountains and went camping at Mahai in the Royal Natal National Park in the Northern Drakensberg.  The year has started out a wee bit busy so my posts featuring Mahai and the Drakensberg has been a bit on the slow side to flow out the keyboard, but watch this space...

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

The Drakensberg Amphitheatre

The Amphitheatre must surely be the most recognised and best know feature of the Drakensberg and looked down over us while we were camping in the Royal Natal National Park in December.  

The Amphitheatre is over 5 kilometers in length and the cliffs along its entire face is about 1 220 meters high at average.  The source of the Tugela River is up in this section of the Drakensberg and the Tugela Falls, the second highest waterfall in the world after the Angel Falls in South America, plunges 948 meters over the side of the Amphitheatre.

I took the photo from the dam close to the Royal Natal National Park Reception building early one windless morning. 

Monday, February 6, 2017

Vygies in the veld outside Matatiele

Vygies come in all shapes, sizes and colours.  These little ones I found on the mountain above Matatiele on a visit to the Matatiele Mountain Lake.  I have two types of vygies in my garden, both creeper type plants with tin green leaves.  This specific one has ticker and rounder leaves and look a more like a typical succulent.  A little search on the internet gave me the following: 

Stone plants - Aizoaceae or Ficoidaceae is a family of dicotyledonous flowering plants containing 135 genera and about 1900 species. They are commonly known as stone plants, carpet weeds or vygies. 

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

A visit to Matatiele in the Eastern Cape highlands

I haven't really had the opportunity to venture into the North Eastern Cape so a first visit to Matatiele in the Eastern Cape highlands near boundary with Kwa-Zulu Natal was on the cards while en route to the Drakensberg in December.  Matatiele services the surrounding villages and farming community and gives a very good first impression.  Even though it was a long weekend and only about a week before Christmas, the town was neat and tidy, unlike some of the other towns we passed through on our way there.  Surrounded by the the Southern Drakensberg, Matatiele is a great starting or finishing point for trips into neighbouring Lesotho, especially for bikers.  

A very popular activity in the area is fly-fishing and for that Matatiele has the perfect spot. The Matatiele Mountain Lake.  This 30-hectare lake is located in the mountain above town and forms part of the Matatiele Nature Reserve which is a core protected area within the Maloti Drakensberg Transfrontier Conservation Area.    

It was up to this lake that Phillip Rawlins, owner of Resthaven Guesthouse in town, brought us while showing us around town. Wow, what a beautiful and peaceful spot.  He explained that the lake is a natural lake fed by three springs and not a dam.  It means that the water is clean and unpolluted and the perfect spot to fish for rainbow trout.  

Driving back down the pass to town this was the view of Matatiele with Lesotho off beyond the mountains on the horizon.  I wish our stay was long enough to venture over the border with Phillip (the invitation was there), but the Drakensberg was calling and our time limited.  Next time I will definitely slot in an extra day or two to visit the Mountain Kingdom.

While in Matatiele we stayed at the excellent Resthaven Guesthouse.  Resthaven is located on the main drag through town and offers 22 rooms stretched over four buildings on the property surrounded by lush green lawns.  Owners Phillip and Elrita welcomed us with open arms and typical small town hospitality was evident the whole time we were there.  Breakfasts were spot on but I can't help but to comment on the dinners.  No fancy meals, no extensive menu, just good hearty plates of food, well prepared by Phillip and the kitchen staff.  The guesthouse is the perfect overnight spot for anybody wanting to stay over in Matatiele.

Disclosure: We stayed over in Matatiele at the invitation of the owners of Resthaven Guesthouse who I have known for many years.  They didn't expect me to do a blog post about the town nor the guesthouse and will probably be very surprised if they get to see this.  All opinions are my own and they had no input on the content of this post. 

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

A spider's pantry

We always say that we have to look at the bigger picture and not just be narrow minded and get stuck in the same rut over and over.  When you travel though you should really pry your eyes away from a bigger picture at times and look for the little things as well.  Travelling up to the Drakensberg we spent two nights in Matatiele in the North Eastern Cape and went to have a look at the Matatiele Mountain Lake in the mountains above town.  An absolutely stunning but hidden beauty.  While the Damselfly and KidZ were admiring the surroundings I was looking for interesting angles to photograph it from and while getting down on my haunches between some rocks I came across a spider's pantry.  Didn't see the spider though but made sure I wasn't hanging around when he got hungry.